Available courses

The Radon Fundamentals course has been developed to provide tribes with, an introduction to the mechanics of radon, examples of how tribes are addressing radon, and possible funding opportunities. This course does not provide radon certification.

The presentations in this course were originally developed as webinars in February and March 2016 in collaboration with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 9 Tribal Indoor Air Quality and Health Network and staff from Spokane Tribe Department of Natural Resources, Navajo Nation EPA, Taos Pueblo Tribal Housing Office, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This online course is equivalent to 0.7 continuing education units (CEUs) and requires approximately seven hours of total learning time. CEUs are earned by completing each of the following course requirements:

  • View ten videos (10-15 minutes average length)
  • Post to five discussion forums (two include activities)
  • Two assignments
  • Three quizzes
  • One reflective writing
  • One final exam
  • One evaluation

 After completing this online course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain what radon is.
  • Describe the potential health effects from exposure to radon.   
  • Describe how radon enters a home.
  • Recognize which radon mitigation systems are effective for different types of building structures.
  • Locate different types of testing devices available for testing indoor radon levels.
  • Locate additional training that will enable tribal staff to become certified in radon testing and mitigate radon.
  • Initiate the development of a tribal radon program.
  • Locate funding sources for radon testing and mitigation.

Presenters Include:

Mansel Nelson, Senior Program Coordinator, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals

Nolan Hoskie, Radon Specialist, Navajo Nation EPA

Twa-le Abrahamson-Swan, Air Quality Program Manager, Spokane Tribe

Terron Chischilly, Radon Specialist, Navajo Nation EPA

Ryder Freed, Air Radiation Program Coordinator, US EPA Region 9

Jed Harrison, Former Director of the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Lab and Former Sr. Tribal Advisor for the EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air

Daniel V. Suazo, Construction Projects Manager, Tribal Housing Office, Taos Pueblo

Sarah Olsen, Grants Management, US Department of HUD

Rich Seifert, Professor Emeritus, University of Alaska Fairbanks

This online course has been developed as an introduction to building science principles important to healthy, comfortable, energy efficient homes and is intended to help tribal professionals understand and optimize the dynamic “building ecosystem” for occupancy wellness and building performance.

This course was originally developed for Alaska Villages, however, it is applicable to many tribes in cold climates. It will provide participants with an understanding of how the home responds as a “living system” and help participants understand what to look for during a residential home assessment. This online course is equivalent to 0.8 CEUs and requires approximately 8 hours of total learning time by completing the following tasks:

  • Watching  17 videos (approximately 215 minutes of viewing time)
  • Participating in two discussion forums (one includes an activity)
  • Completing 3 assignments
  • Completing one reflective writing
  • Completing three quizzes
  • Completing one final exam
  • Completing a brief evaluation

Participants enrolled in this course are expected to have a good understanding of IAQ basics and a basic understanding of homes in your communities including: sources, health effects, actions to improve IAQ, and what kind of concerns you are trying to address. This course reviews building science principles important to healthy, comfortable, energy efficient homes. 

After completing this online course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how the home responds like a “living system”
  • Understand what to look for during an IAQ assessment

This course will NOT provide a comprehensive understanding of design and construction details.

 

Instructors:

Rich Seifert, Professor, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Energy and Housing Specialist

Mansel Nelson, Senior Program Coordinator, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, Mansel.Nelson@nau.edu 

Many of the presentations within this course were originally developed as an online version of the cold climate homebuilding techniques workshop that Extension’s Rich Seifert has taught for many years.  All Extension’s recordings are available at: https://itunes.apple.com/itunes-u/cold-climate-building-course/id506895267  

This short course will provide participants with: an understanding of what brownfields are, tribal examples of brownfields sites, a summary of brownfields funding sources, how tribes may be able to access brownfields funding, who was using brownfields grant money as of 2013, and contact information for free brownfields technical assistance available to tribes. 

This course has been developed from a public webinar delivered during ITEP’s 2014 Tribal Environmental and Planning online course. Special thanks to Campbell Environmental Group for the coordination of presenters, development, and delivery of the original webinar. This course is equivalent to 0.4 CEUs and requires approximately 4 hours of total learning time by completing the following tasks:

  • Watching four videos
  • Completing five activities that include navigating webpages and viewing resources
  • Participating in two discussion boards
  • Completing one reflective writing
  • Completing one final exam
  • Completing a brief evaluation

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand what Brownfields are.
  • Locate resources for identifying possible Brownfields sites.
  • Identify Brownfields grant programs that may be applicable to their tribe.
  • Understand the distribution of Brownfields funding.

Presenters include:

Dale Mitchell, Brownfields Program Coordinator, Pleasant Point Passamaquoddy Tribe

Amy Jean McKeown, Brownfields Project Officer, United States Environmental Protection Agency

Rich Campbell, Geologist, Campbell Environmental Group

Glenn Daukas, Campbell Environmental Group

The Brownfields Tribal Response Program (TRP) Fundamentals course has been developed to provide tribes with an overview of the CERCLA Section 128(a) State and Tribal Response Program funding. After taking this course tribes will have the information needed to request CERCLA Section 128(a) State and Tribal Response Program funds with a draft work plan as described in the current EPA funding guidance. This course is also useful for new brownfields tribal employees to gain a better understanding of the program they are working in. It is recommended that participants complete ITEP’s Introduction to Brownfields online course for an overview of brownfields and tribal examples prior to beginning this online course.

This online course is equivalent to 0.5 CEUs and requires approximately 5 hours of total learning time. CEUs are earned by completing each of the following course requirements:

  • View eight videos (15 minutes average length)
  • Post to four discussion forums
  • Two activities
  • Two quizzes
  • One reflective writing
  • One final exam
  • One evaluation

After completing this online course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose and scope of the CERCLA Section 128(a) State and Tribal Response Program (TRP).
  • Identify the four elements of a TRP.  
  • Establish and maintain a public record system.
  • Describe the terms and reporting requirements of the CERCLA Section 128(a) State and Tribal Response Program.
  • Identify technical assistance and training opportunities.
  • Identify possible brownfields sites.

Presenters Include:

Rachel Lentz, EPA HQ OBLR

Mary Goolie, EPA Region 10

José García, EPA Region 9

Amy Jean McKeown, EPA Region 1

Mickey Hartnett, Kansas State University

Colette Santasieri, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Inacio Dayrit, Center for Creative Land Recycling

Quality Assurance Fundamentals is an introduction to basic quality assurance / quality control (QA/QC) concepts (bias and precision, with control charts of flow rate QC checks), terminology, and a review of the elements of quality assurance project plans (QAPPs) for environmental monitoring projects. Completion of this course signifies practical understanding of the QA elements of QAPP Level 4 projects, such as indoor air quality or wildlife surveys, or other basic community assessments. This course is equivalent to 1.2 CEU and requires approximately 12 hours of total learning time by completing the following tasks:

  • Watching nine videos (approximately 100 minutes of viewing time)
  • Participating in two discussion forums
  • Completing three assignments
  • Completing one reflective writing
  • Completing three quizzes
  • Completing one final exam
  • Completing a brief evaluation

QA Fundamentals has been developed by the Tribal Air Monitoring Support Center of the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals. This unique, tribally focused, and applied instruction was initiated as a webinar series and has been supplemented with activities, discussions, and tests to provide a training resource and completion certificate. It is intended for tribal environmental professionals as an introduction to quality assurance.

After completing this module, participants will be able to:

  • Understand what you need to know about QA for your project and why it is important.
  • Understand the terminology that is used in QAPPs.
  • Describe QA in common sense terms.
  • Locate helpful resources, materials, and people to ensure quality systems.
  • Identify basic principles of data management.
  • Know how to get started on a QAPP.
  • Identify the required elements for a category 4 QAPP (as categorized by US EPA).

Your instructor is Melinda Ronca-Battista, Health Physicist, CQA.